Terminal: date command use

This is a post to support another post but it can be useful as guide to use date command in general purpose. This command is used to print or set the system date and time. You can find all this just tiping man date on a terminal.

The syntax is very simple:

date [OPTION]... [+FORMAT]

 

and the available OPTIONs are:

-d, –date=STRING
display time described by STRING, not ‘now’

-f, –file=DATEFILE
like –date once for each line of DATEFILE

-I[TIMESPEC], –iso-8601[=TIMESPEC]
output date/time in ISO 8601 format. TIMESPEC=’date’ for date only (the default), ‘hours’, minutes’, ‘seconds’, or ‘ns’ for date and time to the indicated precision.

-r, –reference=FILE
display the last modification time of FILE

-R, –rfc-2822
output date and time in RFC 2822 format. Example: Mon, 07 Aug 2006 12:34:56 -0600

–rfc-3339=TIMESPEC
output date and time in RFC 3339 format. TIMESPEC=’date’, ‘seconds’, or ‘ns’ for date and time to the indicated precision. Date and time components are separated by a single space: 2006-08-07 12:34:56-06:00

-s, –set=STRING
set time described by STRING

-u, –utc, –universal
print or set Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)

–help display this help and exit

–version
output version information and exit

 

While the FORMATs available are:

%a locale’s abbreviated weekday name (e.g., Sun)

%A locale’s full weekday name (e.g., Sunday)

%b locale’s abbreviated month name (e.g., Jan)

%B locale’s full month name (e.g., January)

%c locale’s date and time (e.g., Thu Mar 3 23:05:25 2005)

%C century; like %Y, except omit last two digits (e.g., 20)

%d day of month (e.g., 01)

%D date; same as %m/%d/%y

%e day of month, space padded; same as %_d

%F full date; same as %Y-%m-%d

%g last two digits of year of ISO week number (see %G)

%G year of ISO week number (see %V); normally useful only with %V

%h same as %b

%H hour (00..23)

%I hour (01..12)

%j day of year (001..366)

%k hour, space padded ( 0..23); same as %_H

%l hour, space padded ( 1..12); same as %_I

%m month (01..12)

%M minute (00..59)

%N nanoseconds (000000000..999999999)

%p locale’s equivalent of either AM or PM; blank if not known

%P like %p, but lower case

%r locale’s 12-hour clock time (e.g., 11:11:04 PM)

%R 24-hour hour and minute; same as %H:%M

%s seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC

%S second (00..60)

%T time; same as %H:%M:%S

%u day of week (1..7); 1 is Monday

%U week number of year, with Sunday as first day of week (00..53)

%V ISO week number, with Monday as first day of week (01..53)

%w day of week (0..6); 0 is Sunday

%W week number of year, with Monday as first day of week (00..53)

%x locale’s date representation (e.g., 12/31/99)

%X locale’s time representation (e.g., 23:13:48)

%y last two digits of year (00..99)

%Y year

%z +hhmm numeric time zone (e.g., -0400)

%:z +hh:mm numeric time zone (e.g., -04:00)

%::z +hh:mm:ss numeric time zone (e.g., -04:00:00)

%:::z numeric time zone with : to necessary precision (e.g., -04, +05:30)

%Z alphabetic time zone abbreviation (e.g., EDT)

 

By default, date pads numeric fields with zeroes. The following optional flags may follow ‘%’:

(hyphen) do not pad the field

_ (underscore) pad with spaces

0 (zero) pad with zeros

^ use upper case if possible

# use opposite case if possible

 

Copyright © 2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc. License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>.

About Daniele Dalla Torre

I'm a Civil Engineering student but I love to learn everything about technology, from the basics to the new frontiers! Here my gpg public key!

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